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Field Report Greeting from Indonesia

April 20, 2010

Greetings from Indonesia

Progress in the reforestation project

From January to March, we worked with many local people to plant trees across a total 150 hectares of land. We monitor and manage the trees periodically. It is rainy season now, which provides good conditions for the trees to achieve high survival rate.

In Daikin’s forest, we have planted not only native species, but also fruit trees such as  Aren, Jackfruit, Rambutan, Myristica fragrans  and Jengkol, which were selected by local communities.  All of species were planted to become Green Belt of the Daikin’ forest block.

(c) Conservation International, Photo by Anton Ario

(c) Conservation International, Photo by Anton Ario

Progress in the reforestation project

Environmental learning through music

Music is a universal language. Everyone likes music. As such, it can even convey a message on the importance of environmental protection. In our mobile environmental education program, we use music as a means to enhance children’s awareness and understanding of the environment. We have composed a song with the theme of nature and its preservation, which we sing with children at schools. Our admiration goes to the children, who are never shy about singing in front of others. We hope that this project of environmental learning through music leads to a bright future for the children.

“To Be Green”

Open my eyes, feel the fresh air, the sound of nature tells morning is here
Rising sun the songbirds greet, as they glide from tree to tree

But now it is here no more
My forest is here no more

Bring back my green forest; stop hurting my forest
Bring back my green forest; stop hurting our nature

It’s for the people’s sake too…

(c) Conservation International, Photo by Anton Ario

(c) Conservation International, Photo by Anton Ario

Environmental learning through music

Wildlife investigation in Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park

Wild boars are a common species in Indonesia and frequently captured on 10 cameras set up in the Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park. The wild boar is an unwelcome guest for farmers, however, as they cause damage to carefully grown corn and cassava. A fellow inhabitant of the forest, the Javan leopard prevents the wild boar from overly increasing in number, thus playing an important role in maintaining a balanced ecosystem. Wild boars are valuable prey for the predators.

(c) Conservation International, Photo by Anton Ario

Wildlife investigation in Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park

progress in the reforestation project

  • progress in the reforestation project
  • progress in the reforestation project
  • Environmental learning through music
  • Environmental learning through music
  • Wildlife investigation in Gunung Gede pangrango
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