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Field Reports Greetings from Indonesia

January 23, 2014

Greetings from Indonesia

Progress in the reforestation project

In December 2013, we replanted saplings in 50 hectares of land together with local farmers participating in the project and rangers of Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park.

Replanting saplings—this may sound easy, but working on such a vast expanse of land, particularly in the buffer zone of a national park, involves a great deal of preparation. First we help the farmers obtain formal status to use the land while managing it as a forest. Next we draw up a detailed map, open up a trail to access to the site, create ridges along the slope, fertilize the soil, dig holes for the saplings, bring the saplings from the nursery, and set them in place. Then, finally we plant the saplings.

  • Progress in the reforestation project
Progress in the reforestation project

This time we planted saplings of manglid (family Magnoliaceae), lame (family Apocynaceae), and janitri (family Elaeocarpaceae). As before, all are species native to Indonesia.

The restored forest that we are replanting and nurturing together now covers 300 hectares of land. We continue to look after the young trees, hoping they will grow into a fine forest.

  • Progress in the reforestation project
Progress in the reforestation project

Forest and toilets

In November, we completed building toilets as a part of the project. The significance of building toilets in a reforestation project may not be obvious at first glance. But to restore and to preserve the forest, we believe it is essential to improve the lives of the local communities living near the forest, and to help the residents understand the importance of protecting the forest by acquiring knowledge and the skills to protect it on their own. Our efforts in agroforestry, private water supply, agriculture and freshwater fish farming, and environmental education are all planned to this end. The same goes for toilets, as they will guard the village children from disease and enable the villagers to use the water from the forest, while keep it clean.

  • Forest and toilets
  • Forest and toilets
Forest and toilets

In late November, a simple ceremony was organized in the village with the new toilets.

Before an audience of 80 comprised of the village residents and officers of the local government, a pail was presented to the village chief as a token of the completion of the new facility. In closing, fry were released into the village fish pond.

  • Forest and toilets
  • Forest and toilets
Forest and toilets

Ketupat

Do Japanese people prepare a special dish to celebrate festivals? In Indonesia, the standard dish for auspicious occasions is the ketupat. Pouches of woven palm leaves are filled with rice and left to steam for four to five hours. Although the Indonesian language and culture varies largely from region to region, the tradition of making ketupat is shared nationwide.

  • Ketupat
    Ketupat

Signboard

We continue to look after the signboard. It remained in good condition between October and December.

  • Signboard October 2013
    October 2013
  • Signboard November 2013
    November 2013
  • Signboard December 2013
    December 2013

In November, we set up a new signboard, inscribed with the names of new customers, in the village of Panyusuhan.

  • Signboard
    Signboard

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  • Progress in the reforestation project
  • Progress in the reforestation project
  • Forest and toilets
  • Forest and toilets
  • Forest and toilets
  • Forest and toilets
  • Ketupat
  • Signboard October 2013
  • Signboard November 2013
  • Signboard December 2013
  • Signboard

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